Geology of Dingle Bay - Sheet 20

     1:100,000 series index

Area covered by the Map and Booklet



Booklet Contents

  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
  • PREFACE
  • GENERAL INTRODUCTION
  • READING THE GEOLOGICAL MAP OF DINGLE BAY
  • A SUMMARY OF THE GEOLOGY AND THE ROCK TYPES AROUND DINGLE BAY
    • Lower Palaeozoic rocks
    • Upper Palaeozoic rocks
    • Variscan deformation
    • Mesozoic rocks
    • Igneous rocks
    • Quaternary geology
    • THE BEDROCK GEOLOGY OF THE DINGLE BAY AREA
      • Dunquin Group
      • Old Red Sandstone sequence of the Dingle Peninsula
      • Devonian sequence of the Iveragh Peninsula
      • Carboniferous
      • Cretaceous
      • Cenozoic igneous activity
      • Basin development and deformation history
          • MINERAL RESOURCES
            • Metallic minerals
            • Industrial minerals and rocks
                • HYDROGEOLOGY
                • REFERENCES AND ADDITIONAL READING LIST
                • APPENDIX 1. Key localities
                • APPENDIX 2. Brief lithological descriptions of all stratigraphic units shown on the accompanying map
                • APPENDIX 3. Glossary


                  • Two plates from the booklet:

                    Tetrapod track in the Valentia Slate Formation on Valentia Island

                    Photo by Markus Pracht



                    The angular unconformity between the Pointagare Group and the underlying Smerwick Group in the cliffs of the eastern side of Sauce Creek (grid reference is approximately 04940 11635). The unconformity, difficult of access, marks a period of mountain building which folded the rocks of the Smerwick group, here parallel-bedded fine to medium grained grey sandstones, into a near vertical orientation. The unconformity represents the ancient land surface upon which were deposited conglomerates and pebbly sandstones, the products of erosion of nearby mountains. A further period of mountain building has folded the rocks so that the unconformity and the overlying sediments, now the rocks of the Pointagare Group, are tilted at an angle of 20 degrees to the north.

                    Photo by L. Richmond