3D Modelling
3D geological modelling is important for solving many of societies' needs and for informed decision making. 3D modelling is used routinely in Mining and Petroleum Exploration. In Ireland, 3D modelling could be useful for assessing the potential of CO storage and geothermal energies as well as ongoing requirements for groundwater protection and infrastructural developments. 
After the initial testing of different 3D software, 3D models of the Quaternary geology of Dublin city and Cork city have being created using the GSI3D software that is being developed by the British Geological Survey.


3D model of Dublin


This image represent the Quaternary sediments of the Dublin City Centre and the port area. Sediments are represented with different colours:

  • Blue represents the glacial till
  • Green represents the glaciofluvial sands and gravels
  • Cream represents the alluvial sediments
  • Brown represents the fill-made ground
  • Orange represents the marine sediments
  • Red represents the estuarine sediments
  

In the map you can recognise the shape of a major buried channel that represents the route of the pre-glacial Liffey downstream to Islandbridge. The buried channel turns south of the present River Liffey course just to the west of Heuston Station at Islandbridge and then turns northwards under the Guinness brewery at depths of 20-25m BGL (ca. -20m OD) and on towards Broadstone. It then beers northeast towards the North Circular Road area and the East Wall and Lies at depths of 25-30m. BGL

Also it is possible to see that in central Dublin the Bedrock is totally obscured by the overlying glacial and postglacial deposits.




3D model of Cork


This image represent the Quaternary sediments of the Cork City Centre and the port area. Sediments are represented with different colours:

  • Blue represents the glacial till
  • Green represents the glaciofluvial sands and gravels
  • Cream represents the alluvial sediments
  • Brown representes the fill-made ground
  • Brown-grey represents intake
  • Light brown represents the top soil
  • Orange represents river gravel terraces
  • Yellow represents the marine sediments
  • Red represents the estuarine sediments
  • Grey represents bedrock
  


In the map you can recognise EW folding that result in two types of areas:

  1. Areas in which the bedrock is outcropping or it is very close to the surface (the ridges of the folds)
  2. Areas in which the Quaternary sediments are very thick and it is difficult to reach the bedrock (the valleys of the folds)

The surface of the bedrock is very irregular with the result that the thickness of the Quaternary sediments in the valleys can change rapidly in short distances.